Category Archives: Establishing a barn quilt trail

Barn Quilt Conference

Are you interested in

“Getting on the Barn Quilt Trail”

join us at the barn quilt trail

CONFERENCE October 22 & 23, 2013

Homeward Bound

-Learn how to make a barn quilt-

-Learn how to make a barn quilt trail-

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Invitation to launch May 22, 2013 in Strathroy, ON

Strathroy:  All those who have had any involvement with barn quilts in the area are urged to attend the launch of the Ontario Barn Quilt Trails project at the new Tourism Middlesex office which is co-located with Amy’s Restaurant at 28537 Centre Road in Strathroy 10 a.m. on May 22nd.  Barn quilts have captured the imagination of rural Ontario and the purpose of a new Ontario-wide project  funded by Trillium is to support local efforts to tell their story through the arts.   Read the rest of this entry

New Project: Ontario-wide support by Ontario Trillium Foundation

Project Background and Objectives

 

The goal of the  Ontario Barn Quilt Trails project is to promote barn quilt trails throughout Ontario as a way to tell community stories.  There will be a conference in October to share best practices and tools for implementing community barn quilt projects. The project will provide seed funding to a few communities to demonstrate how a project is put together.

 

Barn quilts are already popping up across Ontario.  What is needed now is a powerful on-line map where (1) communities can register their barn quilts, (2) where appreciators can discover and read the stories that go with the barn quilts (and plan their trip to visit them), and (3) where businesses and organizations can help promote the barn quilt trails.

 

Barn quilts have proven to be powerful medium for communities to tell their stories.   Museum curators across the five counties of Elgin, Oxford, Norfolk, Middlesex, and Elgin established several trails in 2012. They discovered that barn quilts work at many levels: Read the rest of this entry

Barn quilt trail officially launched

by Marie Williams-Gagnon, Transcript & Free Press, Hayter-Walden Publications

It was a week of recognition and appreciation for the barn quilt trails which are spreading through the countryside, spurred locally by an initial project in Wardsville.

Over 100 people gathered at the Melbourne Agricultural Hall on Saturday morning, September 29 for the launch of the Longwoods Barn Quilt Trail. Days earlier, the Native Women’s Trail of Tears Quilt had been unveiled.
M.C. Diana Jedig explained the basis of the barn quilt projects and introduced various council members in attendance from neighbouring municipalities.
The Native Women’s Trail of Tears quilt was unveiled, along with the Longwoods Quilt and an actual 8’ x 8’ barn quilt featuring an image of Tecumseh. South Caradoc has installed barn quilts along Muncey Rd. that relate to their settlement history, dating back to the 1830s.
Sheila Devost of Tourism Middlesex read a message from M.P. Bev Shipley before Tillsonburg mayor and SCOR chairman John Lessif spoke about their mandate of promoting tourism. He said that he is amazed at the visitors coming to tour the trails in his area and the number of volunteers coming together to make the vision a reality.
Jedig introduced the visionary of the project, Denise Corneil, who introduced barn quilts when she garnered support to create 30 blocks in time for Wardsville’s bi-centennial in 2010. 
Corneil expressed appreciation and listed the names of volunteers. She was thrilled that the 15 Chippewa blocks were all painted in one weekend. “At one time my car had 140 litres of primer paint in it and the paint moved down the road from Delaware and Thamesville. I’m very excited about the project and how it’s benefitted the community.”
Strathroy-Caradoc mayor Joanne Vanderheyden recognized the hosts of the barn quilts who are “caring for cultural folk art.”  With each barn quilt costing approximately $1,000, the sponsors were thanked, along with those who sponsored the original Wardsville trail, the researchers and designers.
A trio of Native singers and drummers shared two numbers before Devost welcomed the crowd to visit sites during Doors Open Middlesex, held that weekend. She announced that Tourism Middlesex has received $55,000 to commemorate the War of 1812. “There are bigger things still to come.”Marie Williams-Gagnon
Editor
Transcript & Free Press
Glencoe, Ontario
519-287-2615
marie@hayter-walden.com

Hancock County, Ohio

Donna Sue Groves linked Mary Simpson up with Barb Gabriel near Arcadia, Ohio, for a visit in early December 2011. Barb has activated the community and lots of groups are stepping forward to design, paint, host, and pay for barn quilts. Barb enjoys the students who are painting in her garage. Watch her community project grow at http://hcohiobarnquilts.blogspot.com.

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Thanks for the wonderful hospitality, Barb and Jim!

Mary Simpson