Category Archives: History, HERstories, and Myths

Stories, both fact and myth, about Ontario.

Longwoods Launch – 120 attend

 

 

Diana Jedig, enthusiastic painter of barn quilts, Executive Director of Ontario Assn of Community Futures Development Corps, and emcee

 

Unveiling of the block “Tecumseh”

 

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Barn quilt trail officially launched

by Marie Williams-Gagnon, Transcript & Free Press, Hayter-Walden Publications

It was a week of recognition and appreciation for the barn quilt trails which are spreading through the countryside, spurred locally by an initial project in Wardsville.

Over 100 people gathered at the Melbourne Agricultural Hall on Saturday morning, September 29 for the launch of the Longwoods Barn Quilt Trail. Days earlier, the Native Women’s Trail of Tears Quilt had been unveiled.
M.C. Diana Jedig explained the basis of the barn quilt projects and introduced various council members in attendance from neighbouring municipalities.
The Native Women’s Trail of Tears quilt was unveiled, along with the Longwoods Quilt and an actual 8’ x 8’ barn quilt featuring an image of Tecumseh. South Caradoc has installed barn quilts along Muncey Rd. that relate to their settlement history, dating back to the 1830s.
Sheila Devost of Tourism Middlesex read a message from M.P. Bev Shipley before Tillsonburg mayor and SCOR chairman John Lessif spoke about their mandate of promoting tourism. He said that he is amazed at the visitors coming to tour the trails in his area and the number of volunteers coming together to make the vision a reality.
Jedig introduced the visionary of the project, Denise Corneil, who introduced barn quilts when she garnered support to create 30 blocks in time for Wardsville’s bi-centennial in 2010. 
Corneil expressed appreciation and listed the names of volunteers. She was thrilled that the 15 Chippewa blocks were all painted in one weekend. “At one time my car had 140 litres of primer paint in it and the paint moved down the road from Delaware and Thamesville. I’m very excited about the project and how it’s benefitted the community.”
Strathroy-Caradoc mayor Joanne Vanderheyden recognized the hosts of the barn quilts who are “caring for cultural folk art.”  With each barn quilt costing approximately $1,000, the sponsors were thanked, along with those who sponsored the original Wardsville trail, the researchers and designers.
A trio of Native singers and drummers shared two numbers before Devost welcomed the crowd to visit sites during Doors Open Middlesex, held that weekend. She announced that Tourism Middlesex has received $55,000 to commemorate the War of 1812. “There are bigger things still to come.”Marie Williams-Gagnon
Editor
Transcript & Free Press
Glencoe, Ontario
519-287-2615
marie@hayter-walden.com

Native Women’s Quilt of Tears

The Chippewa Barn Quilters Group Commemorated First Nation Women & Families of the War of 1812

Thursday, September 27, 2012 at the Antler River Seniors Centre, north of Muncey Village

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Compass

Hosted by Tom and Trish May Farms, 677 Longwoods Road, Wardsville.

Brock gave Tecumseh a Pocket Compass when they met to plan their attack on Fort Detroit. After his death at the Battle of the Thames on October 5, 1813, a warrior requested that the compass be engraved in Tecumseh’s memory.

“Sell a country! Why not sell the air, the clouds, the great sea as well as the earth?” Tecumseh asked. Tecumseh had a genius for strategy.  He was a man of intelligence, eloquence, courage and character, a relentless enemy but a merciful victor to captives. He was respected and held in high esteem by friend and foe alike. While fierce and fearless in warfare, Tecumseh was an honourable opponent. Ever “merciful and magnanimous,” this “gallant and impetuous spirit” learned idealism and compassion from his brother The Prophet, and was never savage or sadistic to his captives.

When no less a personage than Isaac Brock said of him, “A more sagacious or gallant warrior does not exist,” he was speaking of one of the continent’s unforgettable sachems, perhaps, the most lauded Aboriginal leader in North American history.

Excerpt from Upper Canada History Narratives: Tecumseh

Dogwood

Hosted by Scott and Lenore Patterson, 406 Longwoods Rd, Newbury, ON

Dogwood

My name is Elizabeth Bedford. I am 78 years old in this the year of our Lord, 1850. I guess you’re wanting me to tell what it was like when my husband Robert and I came to take possession of the land granted him by the British Crown for his military service in the American Revolution.

My heart sank at the sight of the mighty trees whose huge trunks stretched to the veryheavens and whose canopy of leaves were so dense that the light of day could not penetrate to where we stood.

At first I cursed the forest, its gloominess,its dangers — thieves and wild animals. I dared not let the children out of my sight for many an adult was known to lose his way. Read the rest of this entry