Category Archives: What’s the impact?

Stories and testimonies of the social and economic impacts that barn quilt trails are having on rural communities.

Half of Parks Canada assets in ‘poor’ shape

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Back on June 19, 2012 while touring the local Lambeth historical society along the Longwoods Barn Quilt Trail, our stop at the Battle of the Longwoods cairn was enriched by the coincidence of meeting up with Parks Canada staff.  The sad news he admitted is that the Harper government is not allocating enough money to maintain assets such as this cairn.  This aging cairn needs yearly maintenance to keep it in good repair.  Mary Simpson promised she would pass along our disappointment to our MP, Bev Shipley.  The Longwoods Barn Quilt Trail is all about appreciating our local history.  Little evidence remains of the War of 1812-14.  This delicate cairn is precious.

Many months later, Parks Canada admits that 47% of all its assets are in poor or very poor condition.  A separate sampling pushed that overall level to 53%.

Feb 12, 2014 Globe & Mail Article :  Internal report says Parks Canada buildings in worse shape than claimed – The Globe and Mail

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Remembering Scott Patterson

Suddenly on Friday August 30, 2013, as the result of an accident, Scott Gordon Patterson of R.R. 3 Newbury in his 53rd year.   Scott was a born farmer.  He became the next generation to care for the land and truly loved his farming life.  He devoted more than 30 years to trucking sweet corn, making many life-long friends “in the corn patch”.  He owned and operated a snowplow truck for the MTO for over 25 years, clearing the way for travellers on the 401.  He was a faithful elder at St. John’s Presbyterian Church, Wardsville.  Scott visited many ballparks in Southwestern Ontario, through his own days of playing baseball and then watching his daughters.  He was passionate about all of his activities – but most of all he loved all his girls. His competitive nature, sense of humor and hard work ethic will remain in the hearts of his family, as they cherish his memory.  They were truly blessed to have him in their life.
Full obituary: http://www.vanheckfuneralhome.ca/scott-patterson
Also: McLean’s Magazine obituary column called “The End” featuring Scott on October 15, 2013
The Dogwood Barn Quilt is installed on Scott’s barn at 406 Longwoods Rd, Newbury, ON  Scott is the beloved husband of 28 years of Lenore (McColl).  Scott was a proud and loving father of his 5 daughters, Krista (Gary Simpson), Emily (Jeremy Featherstone), Hilary in Heaven, Megan (Justin Staels) and Kelly.   Scott is now the story behind the Dogwood Barn Quilt but for the original story see The Story:  “My name is Elizabeth Bedford.”
 

New Project: Ontario-wide support by Ontario Trillium Foundation

Project Background and Objectives

 

The goal of the  Ontario Barn Quilt Trails project is to promote barn quilt trails throughout Ontario as a way to tell community stories.  There will be a conference in October to share best practices and tools for implementing community barn quilt projects. The project will provide seed funding to a few communities to demonstrate how a project is put together.

 

Barn quilts are already popping up across Ontario.  What is needed now is a powerful on-line map where (1) communities can register their barn quilts, (2) where appreciators can discover and read the stories that go with the barn quilts (and plan their trip to visit them), and (3) where businesses and organizations can help promote the barn quilt trails.

 

Barn quilts have proven to be powerful medium for communities to tell their stories.   Museum curators across the five counties of Elgin, Oxford, Norfolk, Middlesex, and Elgin established several trails in 2012. They discovered that barn quilts work at many levels: Read the rest of this entry

Northcott Silk Inc. sponsors the War of 1812 story quilts!!

Northcott Silk Inc. has donated bolts and bolts of fabric for the two War of 1812 story quilts.

Northcott is an International Distributor and Converter of fine cotton printed fabrics for the quilt, craft and home decor industries.

Founded in 1935, Northcott was originally a fashion textile converter. During the mid ’80s they shifted focus to the  cotton print market. Their cotton prints are in retail stores and quilt shops around the world.

Sixty blocks have been designed. One by one they are being pieced together by quilters throughout the area.  Joan Hillhorst, at Sew Creative,  quilt coordinator, is looking for a quilting group to stitch the quilt.

Shirley Baker and Freda Henry plan story quilt.

Happy Women’s Day