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Remembering Scott Patterson

Suddenly on Friday August 30, 2013, as the result of an accident, Scott Gordon Patterson of R.R. 3 Newbury in his 53rd year.   Scott was a born farmer.  He became the next generation to care for the land and truly loved his farming life.  He devoted more than 30 years to trucking sweet corn, making many life-long friends “in the corn patch”.  He owned and operated a snowplow truck for the MTO for over 25 years, clearing the way for travellers on the 401.  He was a faithful elder at St. John’s Presbyterian Church, Wardsville.  Scott visited many ballparks in Southwestern Ontario, through his own days of playing baseball and then watching his daughters.  He was passionate about all of his activities – but most of all he loved all his girls. His competitive nature, sense of humor and hard work ethic will remain in the hearts of his family, as they cherish his memory.  They were truly blessed to have him in their life.
Full obituary: http://www.vanheckfuneralhome.ca/scott-patterson
Also: McLean’s Magazine obituary column called “The End” featuring Scott on October 15, 2013
The Dogwood Barn Quilt is installed on Scott’s barn at 406 Longwoods Rd, Newbury, ON  Scott is the beloved husband of 28 years of Lenore (McColl).  Scott was a proud and loving father of his 5 daughters, Krista (Gary Simpson), Emily (Jeremy Featherstone), Hilary in Heaven, Megan (Justin Staels) and Kelly.   Scott is now the story behind the Dogwood Barn Quilt but for the original story see The Story:  “My name is Elizabeth Bedford.”
 
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Compass

Hosted by Tom and Trish May Farms, 677 Longwoods Road, Wardsville.

Brock gave Tecumseh a Pocket Compass when they met to plan their attack on Fort Detroit. After his death at the Battle of the Thames on October 5, 1813, a warrior requested that the compass be engraved in Tecumseh’s memory.

“Sell a country! Why not sell the air, the clouds, the great sea as well as the earth?” Tecumseh asked. Tecumseh had a genius for strategy.  He was a man of intelligence, eloquence, courage and character, a relentless enemy but a merciful victor to captives. He was respected and held in high esteem by friend and foe alike. While fierce and fearless in warfare, Tecumseh was an honourable opponent. Ever “merciful and magnanimous,” this “gallant and impetuous spirit” learned idealism and compassion from his brother The Prophet, and was never savage or sadistic to his captives.

When no less a personage than Isaac Brock said of him, “A more sagacious or gallant warrior does not exist,” he was speaking of one of the continent’s unforgettable sachems, perhaps, the most lauded Aboriginal leader in North American history.

Excerpt from Upper Canada History Narratives: Tecumseh

Homeward Bound

Hosted by the Mitton Farm: 14561 Longwoods Rd, Thamesville, ON
Painted by the Glencoe Rotary
If not for the kindness of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, I know not what would become of me or my poor twin infants. Instead, we have been given money and a wagon to take us home to our family in Amherstburg.

Moraviantown is no more. It had been our home briefly until it was set ablaze by the Americans.

The defeat left us again homeless and in a state of terror, rending the air with sobs and lamentations. We were a war-worn group and as I wandered aimlessly with a baby on each hip, I encountered an enemy officer. Unbeknownst to me, he retold my plight to the Commodore and I was provided with money and a wagon to transport us home to Amherstburg, a distance of more than 100 miles.

“May God bless and prosper him. He is the kindest and most generous gentleman in the world and has been an angel of mercy to me and my poor babies. He has not only paid this man to take us home but has given me all this money for these dear little ones.”  We are, at last, homeward bound!

By Anne Carruthers, February 2012


Source: In the Midst of Alarms; The Untold Story of Women and the War of 1812, Dianne Graves, 2007, Robin Brass Studio Inc., Montreal, Que. Pg.285-286

Memory

Memory, Curran Farms, 13689 Longwoods Road, Thamesville ON

Hosted by Curran Farms, 13689 Longwoods Rd Thamesville,  Chatham-Kent,  ON 

Painted by the Bothwell Boy Scouts Troup  and Families

Word has reached our farm that the Americans are coming this way. I hide in a thicket a distance from the house in hopes that I am invisible to their keen, hungry eyes. It gives me time to gather my thoughts of times gone by.

Memories of leaving an old country for a new one, across a vast ocean.  Memories of departing again, for a beginning in a newer, better country. Memories of working side by side with my husband to clear our very own land. Memories of my first garden with the fragrant scent of lily-of-the valley but also the cabbages, onions and squash that kept us over the long winter. Memories of evenings with the family, keeping warm by the blazing hearth. Memories of two tiny graves in a clearing in the woods. Memories of the first whispers of war which we were reluctant to believe. Now they are memories no more, but a cold, cruel reality.

I am disinclined to leave my home and especially, those tiny graves, but if I must, I will rely on my happy memories to sustain me.

Written by Anne Carruthers, Melbourne.  February 2012

Longwoods Quilt honours women of War of 1812

  Here it is:

What everyone has been waiting for. Through vision, creativity and hard work, the thirty block Longwoods Quilt is completed.  Click above on Stories to find the story that goes with each block.

What a project we have created to commemorate the War of 1812 women.

Thanks to Northcott Fabric and Joan Hillhorst at Sew Creative and all the Ladies of the  Quilt Team.  Call Joan at Sew Creative to enquire about borrowing the quilt and a speaker  for your community group. (519) 264-2177